Chloe Kim’s Kellogg’s Corn Flakes Box -Sold Out in 7 Hours!

I first heard that Olympic Gold medalist in halfpipe snowboarding Chloe Kim made the cover of Kellogg’s Corn Flakes while watching an interview with her on The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon, and then later, finding the press release:

“To celebrate Chloe Kim’s Gold Medal win with Team USA at the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018, Kellogg’s® has announced that she will be featured on Gold Medal edition boxes of Kellogg’s Corn Flakes®. Boxes are available in limited quantities for a short time only on KelloggsFamilyRewards.com.

The Gold Medal Edition Kellogg’s Corn Flakes cereal box is available on KelloggsFamilyRewards.com, while supplies last. Fans can visit KelloggsFamilyRewards.com for information about how to become a member and order their very own collectible box.”

But I was disappointed to not only learn that this special edition box was only available online, but was already sold out:

“On Wednesday night, the Chloe Kim “Gold Medal” box was announced on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon and became available online. It sold out in seven hours, according to Sam Minardi, director of brand marketing at Kellogg Company. “That is a record,” Minardi said in an email.”

I wonder why Kellogg decided to only make this available online! I mean, Nathan Chen’s box made it into retail, and he didn’t even medal (though he was expected to …)

Asian American Commercial Watch: Minute Maid’s #ShibSibs Journey – Maia and Alex Shibutani

https://youtu.be/sCxTokW3310

Congratulations to brother-and-sister duo Maia and Alex Shibutani on winning the Bronze in the 2018 Winter Olympics for Ice Dancing. No doubt, if you’ve been watching the Winter Olympics, you’ve seen this ad, which really doesn’t seem like an ad, highlighting the sibilings’ journey to the Olympics:

“Minute Maid is proud to support Maia and Alex Shibutani on their journey to The Olympic Winter Games. The siblings and teammates know a thing or two about healthy competition, but they also know that the best moments – both on and off the rink – are often shared. Cheers to the #ShibSibs

I had noticed recently that the Shib Sibs had posted a YouTube video seeing for themselves for the first time on some Minute Maid cartons:

So I wound up going to my local grocery store to check out the Minute Maid cartons. However, I could only find three out of the four that they mentioned:

I wonder what the 4th carton is?!?

Also, I had noticed that Intel was one of their sponsors as well, when I noticed on Facebook, Intel congratulating them:

I knew that Intel was an Olympic sponsor, given that they powered the Drone exhibition during the opening ceremonies of the Olympics.But I didn’t know that Intel had sponsored any athletes. But a quick Google search came across this press release listing their sponsored Intel athletes (which I thought was kind of an oxymoron …):

  • Ayumu Hirano – Japanese snowboarding phenom and silver medalist in halfpipe at the
    Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014.
  • Fan Kexin – Chinese short track speedskater and silver medalist in the 1,000 meter at the
    Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014.
  • Hannah Brandt – Forward on the U.S. women’s Ice Hockey Team and University of Minnesota’s
    all-time points leader.
  • Marissa Brandt – South Korean ice hockey defender and former star at Gustavus Adolphus
    College.
  • Maia and Alex Shibutani – U.S. ice dancing team and current two-time U.S. champions.

It’s interesting that Intel sponsors non-U.S. athletes, but then again, they are a global company with global customers.

Again, congrats to the Shibutanis on winning the Bronze!

Asian American Commercial Watch: Team United & Nathan Chen

While watching the Olympics, I saw this United TV commercial and was surprised to see U.S. figure skater Nathan Chen, since I wasn’t aware that United was one of his sponsors, unlike Kellogg’s, Bridgestone and John Wilson. The super hero-themed commercial itself is a little bit weird if you ask me:

Helping superheroes fly for 38 years. Proud to fly Team USA.

The behind the scenes video on YouTube on how they made the commercial is pretty interesting.

Also, on United’s YouTube channel, they even have a 60 second “origin” video which discusses how Chen got into figure skating:

Congrats to Nathan Chen on his historic performance at the 2018 Winter Olympics!

Asian American Commercial Watch: Visa’s Real Life Events & Chloe Kim

https://youtu.be/yDTYvtUc8Qc

I caught this Visa commercial while watching the Olympics, which is no surprise since Visa is an Olympic sponsor and was pleasantly surprised to see Chloe Kim towards the end of the commercial:

You know faster is better. We’ve got a faster way to pay.   You don’t have to be an Olympic snowboarder like Chloe Kim to shave seconds off your time at checkout. Tap to pay like a champion with your contactless Visa card where you see the Contactless Symbol. #PyeongChang2018 #TeamVisa

And even before the Olympics started, I’ve seen Visa highlight Chloe Kim in some web ads:

I’m sure we’ll be seeing a lot more of Chloe Kim now that she’s an Olympic Gold winner in the halfpipe! Congrats again Chloe – hope to meet you one day!

Maia & Alex Shibutani Siblings and Madison Chock Make 2018 U.S. Olympic Ice Dance Team

The Japanese American dynamic duo brother & sister siblings Maia & Alex Shibutani (also known as the Shib Sibs), as well as Madison Chock (and her ice dance partner and Evan Bates) made the 2018 U.S. Olympic Ice Dance Figure Skating Team, as announced this past Sunday during a press conference and press release:

“U.S. Figure Skating announced today the ice dance teams who will compete at the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 as part of the U.S. Olympic Figure Skating Team.

The ice dance team is Madison Chock and Evan BatesMadison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue, and Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani.

Madison Chock and Evan Bates are the 2018 U.S. bronze medalists. They are the 2015 U.S. champions, 2016 World bronze medalists and placed eighth at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. After winning silver at both of their Grand Prix assignments this season, they qualified for their fourth-straight Grand Prix Final.

Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani are two-time U.S. champions. They topped the podium at both of their Grand Prix assignments this season before earning bronze at the Grand Prix Final. They are the 2017 World bronze medalists, 2016 World silver medalists, and placed ninth at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia.”

Photo by 8Asians

Earlier that day, I got to see Maia & Alex Shibutani perform, and they were favored to win the Gold for the 2018 U.S. Championships (often referred to as “Nationals”) for Ice Dance, but had a minor hiccup in their free dance routine which cost them dearly, when Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue performed flawlessly, wining in total points (short dance + free dance) 197.12 vs. the Shibutani’s 196.93, a difference of just .19 points!

Maia & Alex Shibutani were amazing. I remember seeing others post about them on Facebook, and you should take a look at yourself at how talented they are.

https://youtu.be/Ny79P7iiHt0

This will be their *second* trip to the Olympics, as they competed also in 2014. Amazing.

Additionally, Asian American Madison Chock and her ice dancing partner Evan Bates made the team as well, and I also had the opportunity to see them perform for the free skate routine.

Photo by 8Asians

From Wikipedia, Chock’s background is: “She is of Chinese-Hawaiian descent on her father’s side, and German, English, Irish, French, and Dutch descent on her mother Barbara Hall’s side.” Chock doesn’t sound like a Chinese last name to me, but perhaps it was anglicized non-traditionally.

2018 U.S. Championships Ice Dancing Press Conference

Congratulations to all who made the Olympic team!

Should Yuna Kim Have Won Gold in Sochi?

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In a shocking turn not even the live news announcers fully expected, Russia’s Adelina Sotnikova took home the gold medal in ladies figure skating (her country’s first), upsetting defending gold-medalist South Korea’s Yuna Kim at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. Italy’s Carolina Kostner, a veteran in the sport, took home the bronze.

The internet, as always, is ablaze in the controversy. Even the New York Times (and Kurt Browning) is confused. Essentially, it all comes down to the math of the ever-confusing scoring system (oh for the days of the perfect 6.0).  The move-by-move breakdown shows where each skater gained points over the other, with Sotnikova gaining a clear edge with technical. Yet many feel she was out-skated by Kim. In my extremely non-expert opinion, Kim is a more beautiful skater in terms of artistry and grace. Both programs were near flawless, and in a sport rife with technical ambition to raise the number of triples and push for higher, faster jumps, it’s hard to know exactly what happened. Sotnikova certainly got a boost from the home crowd and did not break under what must have been immense pressure and expectations. Still, the question remains: Should Yuna Have Won?

Some accusations of controversy stem from the anonymous judging system. And that one of the judges had recently been suspended for trying to fix and event at the Winter Olympics over a decade ago and that another is married to the head of the Russian figure skating federation. A petition to investigate the judging on change.org has already reached more than 1.7 million signatures.

Kim, who announced her retirement after the free skate, has remained poised and accepting of her second-place finish: “The judges give points and I can’t do anything about that. I did all I wanted to do, like I wanted to do it…I did all I can.” A queen to the last, we salute you, Yuna.

Need more reading to help weed through the controversy?

Continue reading “Should Yuna Kim Have Won Gold in Sochi?”

#MiraiEarnedIt: Why the Snub Will Still Matter, Even After the Olympics Are Over

Mirai and an official photographer wipe tears off Ashley's face at Nationals (Photo credit: Washington Post)
Mirai and an official photographer wipe tears off Ashley’s face at Nationals (Photo credit: Washington Post)

By Eugene Hung

“Not being chosen to represent the United States at the Olympic Games in Sochi and at the 2014 World Championships in Japan has been extremely disappointing to me, and it has been very difficult for me to process. … [It] was devastating and I remain confused by US Figure Skating’s decision.”

So said Mirai Nagasu via Facebook comments posted around 3 A.M. on January 30, breaking her long English-language media silence on the controversy we’ve followed for four weeks. (She had spoken briefly to Japanese network Fuji TV while at the Four Continents Championships in Taiwan.)

She’s not the only one who’s confused. Her numerous supporters, along with many journalists, longtime figure skating observers, and figure skating fans, have also been shaking their heads, trying to make sense of it all.

Of course, no one, least of all Mirai, is confused about how U.S. Figure Skating officials justified their decision to leave her off both the Olympic and World Championship teams. Her third-place finish at Nationals was never, according to U.S. Figure Skating’s rules, going to guarantee her a place on them. The decision was based on a comparison of each skater’s 2013-14 “body of work,” meaning each skater’s results in certain major competitions during that time period.

So on this, no one is confused; U.S. Figure Skating officials were operating within their rights when they left Mirai off those teams. The skating federation’s powerful International Committee Management Subcommittee (ICMS), the nine-member group that actually makes the selections, did indeed follow their rules, based on the letter of their law.

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photo credit: nabechiko29 via photopin cc

You’ve Got Questions, We’ve Got … (Crickets)
But did they follow the spirit of their law? Was their decision-making process truly fair and ethical? That’s the big question. And this is where things get confusing, because the big question raises many additional questions, none of which have answers yet. Questions like:

Continue reading “#MiraiEarnedIt: Why the Snub Will Still Matter, Even After the Olympics Are Over”

Asian Women Dominate Olympic Ice

I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned how much I love the Olympics. My favorite sport for the Winter Olympics is, without a doubt, Women’s Figure Skating. There’s something about elegance meeting athleticism that really inspires me. Back in the Kristi Yamaguchi days, I would imagine myself as a beautiful figure skater . . . “Imagine” being the operative word here, folks.

I was especially invested in this year’s Women’s Figure Skating because of Kim Yuna and Mao Asada. I remember watching them when they were just starting out, reading articles of their rivalry and how each girl was motivated by the other (by the competition) to get better. In a rather unpatriotic move, I wanted so much for either Kim or Asada to win the 2010 gold. Although I adore Mirai Nagasu, I hoped that Kim and Asada’s years of hard work and determination would pay off with a nice shiny medal.

You can imagine my joy with the result of Women’s Figure Skating, where Yuna and Asada respectively placed gold and silver. Well, I would have loved it more if Nagasu won Bronze, but hey, we can’t have it all! Kim excelled in both her programs to win the gold medal, along with the respect of so many people. My worry that all the pressure on her slight, but strong shoulders would be too much for her was all for naught. Even though Asada expressed regret at the free skate program, I’m also proud of her all the same.

I can’t end this post without giving a special shout out to Nagasu who had a great showing at her first Olympics. She was 6th going into the Free Skate and after a beautiful program, she bested Miki Ando and Rachael Flatt to finish 4th. She captured the attention of the global community as a hopeful medalist for the 2014 Winter Olympics.

I think it’s appropriate for me to wrap this up with a quote from one of my friends who surprisingly enjoyed Women’s Figure Skating. “What’s with these Asian girls who dominate in figure skating?”

(Image Credit: NBC Olympics)